Latest Posts:

Running like Royalty with California Crown headwear

As an ex-college athlete, I have worn many head coverings in my life. From helmets to skullcaps to caps, my noggin has always been covered. My wife now marvels at the sheer number of hats I have in my closet and, if you see me out and about you can pretty much tell who I am by looking for the guy wearing the Kansas City Royals logo.

While the majority of my hat wearing is done and a casual fashion, over the past few years, I have added more to my running collection. You would think that someone with so many hats already would be drowning in running headwear, but that has not been the case. I have found some but I have really liked and get a heavy rotation from, but many others seem to fit funny or don’t have any style but I am looking for.
California Crown is a company based out of, you guessed it, California, who make a variety of outerwear, garments, and as their name suggests, headwear. They sent us a few items to check out.

Their Crown Commuter is their first venture into the active headwear category. It comes in a few different colors (Olive, Slate, Khaki) and both the cap and the bill are made of water-repellant nylon – a necessity for runners. The look was inspired from the cycling industry (showcased by a small checkered flag visual). Here’s a description of what they are going for:

It is safe to say that we recently have been obsessed with actively inclined headwear, and the CA Commuter series is our direct response to what we feel is a lack of hats suited for individuals on the move. With our mission in mind to create a durable yet practical crown, we combined locally sourced water-repellent nylon with a classic five-panel shape, thus creating the stylish silhouette that can also withstand nearly all elements.

Inspired by our friends in the various cycling industries, our new water-repellent 5-panels are designed to for those on the move. Featuring our classic ‘Crown Box’ logo alongside the checkered flags, this is our first collection in our new series of active headwear.

These are definitely well made hats. They fit well and looked simplistically great (thought if you aren’t a fan of a flat bill, you may want to consider some of their more curved options). It was a cinch to size up and down – a simple pull on the nylon strap and I was done.

The Sierra CA Explorer is constructed 100% Duck Canvas sourced from North Carolina. It looks less like a running cap than some other, but it is actually designed to showcase durability and maintain form and shape even in the toughest weather (i.e. Oregon winters). Here’s a descriptor on one their test runs:

While traversing the rainforests and bending roads of Hana, we wanted to create a visual account of our CA Explorer field test. Although our bodies had a hard time holding up by the end of the journey, the Crowns proved to stay no worse for their wear.

While this summer hasn’t seen much precipitation, it has seen me expend a lot of sweat. In the few short weeks since having this, I have deposited a river of sweat into it and it still bounces back and looks like new. I’d love to see a simple “or.” in addition to their “ca.” design (though I’m not blind to their reason behind it). It’s still an awesome lid and does the job it is designed to do – and does it well.

Check them out! We know your current running hats are gross.

Company: Crown Commuter (Facebook)

Products:

 


Thank you to California Crown for providing us with some hats Please read our transparency page for info on how we do our reviews.

Advertisements
About Matt Rasmussen (1050 Articles)
Matt Rasmussen lives in Keizer, Ore. with his wife and three daughters. He enjoys watching the Olympics, sampling craft beers, and all things Canada (he was born there). Matt was raised as a baseball player and officially transitioned over to running in 2010. Matt joined the Run Oregon team in October 2011, and since then he has spearheaded the blog’s efforts to cover product reviews, news about businesses related to running, and running events in the Willamette Valley.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: