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Stocking Stuffer idea: Headsweats new REPREVE running shirts

Many running shirts these days are 100% synthetic fibers to get the lightweight “tech” material that we like to exercise in. Polyester is made from the polymer PET, which is also used to make things like soda and ketchup bottles. It is not a far stretch, then, to recycle soda bottles into clothing! Headsweats has done just that by partnering with the global textile solutions provider Unifi to make a clothing line out of REPREVE® recycled fabric.

I had a chance to try out the ladies’ long sleeve performance tee in the Ugly Gingerbread Man print at a holiday themed race this December. Right out of the package, the shirt looked nice, fit well, and had a soft, silky feel. The pattern is cute and the colors beautiful. On race day it was 45* at the start, and wearing a tech short sleeve tshirt underneath, this long sleeve shirt was keeping my arms plenty warm. The seams are soft, and there are no uncomfortable scratchy spots. It’ll be interesting to see how it holds up after several washes, but at first glance, this is a very nice quality shirt. The price is certainly comparable to similar products, and I really like the idea of using recycled bottles to make polyester clothing. The print is wonderfully festive, and I look forward to other print options.

We also checked out a men’s version – a flashy and colorful top complete with topography and Bigfoot. This REPREVE line, while small, has some fun designs to go along with it’s updated green construction. Check out the full line here.


Company: Headsweats

Product tested:

Product specs (from the website):

  • 100% Polyester Pintec REPREVE fabric
  • Made from 5 Recycled Bottles
  • Active fit
  • V-neck collar
  • Long sleeves
  • Full color cutting-edge sublimation
  • Insta-wick™ Moisture wicking technology
  • Tag-free Label for added comfort
  • Machine washable

More about about Headsweats:

Headsweats Perspiration Technology Headwear® was founded in the winter of 1998 by shoe industry veteran and obsessed cyclist, Alan Romick. Frustrated by the perils of heavy sweat blindness, migrating sunscreen, and odd sunburn pattern on his head through his helmet, he set out to develop headgear that worked. Encouraged by the constant feedback within the local cycling community, he took the best attributes of what was available and improved on them. Starting with one product — The Cotton Classic — available at first in just four colors, Alan’s products quietly became elite athlete’s secret weapon around the world, eventually expanding to over 17 different products available in over 140 different colors and styles.

After appearing on a Tour de France rider on the front of the the New York Times sports section, that secret weapon became an open secret and soon Headsweats were running in and winning Ironman Kona, The Head of the Charles Regatta, countless marathons and bike races around the world. With well over a million hats delivered, Headsweats now has more triathlon finishers and podiums than any other headwear company.

Today the Headsweats line includes washable, airlight, supremely wicking hats that now dominate the triathlon, rowing, adventure racing worlds. The success and a spirit of innovation at Headsweats, along with unsurpassed customer service, helped to establish Headsweats as the front runner in a very competitive cycling category. Alan continues to work relentlessly to bring the most cutting-edge, advanced and fun headwear products to new markets for construction workers, chefs, police forces, snow-boarders, and marathoners alike.

Thank you to Headsweats for providing us with samples. Please read our transparency page for info on how we do our reviews.

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