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100 × 1-Mile World Record Attempt Results & Recap

Organizer Gilbert Grundy (Jacuzzi Boys, born in Oakland but hailing from Guildford, UK), Carl Stones (Jacuzzi Boys – Round Rock, Texas), Scott Olberding (Jacuzzi Boys – Winona, Minnesota), Kevin Cave (Jacuzzi Boys – Portland), JT Sullivan (Jacuzzi Boys – Rancho Santa Margarita, California), Will Nation (who flew in from Austin), and Mike Black (BTC Masters). Photo: Kelly Barten

On Saturday, June 2, 100 (very fast) runners congregated at Duniway Track to attempt a new World Record for the 100 × 1-mile Relay. Many were local, but quite a few flew in just for the attempt. In the end, they did not set a new World Record, but they did set a new American Record with a time of 7:44:44. The previous record of 7:51:14 was set at the Rice University Track Stadium in Houston on August 24, 1997.

The relay was run at Duniway Track in SW Portland. In order to make it a true mile for each runner, the first turn was wheeled and coned so each runner would run part of their mile in lane two. An exchange zone was set up near the southwest corner of the track, where most runners and spectators hung out while a few stood at the third turn, the so called “dead zone,” to cheer on the backstretch. The first runner, Karim Sakalia, stepped off at 8a.

The organizer of this attempt was Gilbert Grundy, who says of lining up 100 highly-competitive milers, “It was a lot more difficult than I anticipated!” He started out using a Google Sheet to track runners more than 9 months ago, and had as many as 200 runners committed to the effort at one point. The number and roster was constantly in flux, though, and the week before the event, the confirmed participants numbered 85. As he sought out 15 more guys that could run a fast mile, others had to drop, so it was pretty stressful. The last runners to sign up were Kyle Medina on June 1 and 3 runners who “stepped in on the day.” One runner, who flew in from Nashville and then crashed at Grundy’s house the night after the attempt, heard about it during an interview at Nike and decided to take part.

To find 100 runners, people networked, and in the end some of those that took part didn’t really even know anyone else running. Grundy and his team “tapped into different colleges, clubs and once we got one athlete they dragged a whole crew [to the attempt]. It was awesome how it really brought different camps together.” That was probably my favorite thing about watching – I didn’t know most of the runners during the time I was able to be there, but they wore their college and club singlets with pride. My daughter had a hard time understanding that all the runners were on the same team, but it proved that sometimes running just to see what you can do is the point.

In addition to Nashville, runners flew in from Texas and Indiana, came down from Washington, took a detour to Portland on a cross-country move to San Francisco, and one even cut a work trip early and flew in from Italy!

Organizer Gilbert Grundy

An event like this takes a team, and Grundy was quick to give credit to those that helped spread the word and recruit. “Jordan Welling was a big help with spreading the word among the BTC (Bowerman Track Club) contingent and Nike in general. Sean O’Hollearn knew a few of the UP (University of Portland) contingent who came and threw down some of the most audacious times of the day. Kevin Cave, Scott Olberding, Jake Campbell, and Scott Knackstedt really stepped up and helped take splits and organize people,” he says, noting that there were a lot of people who helped and deserve thanks. “Lots of the guys stepped up that last week,” he adds.

So will he do it again? Maybe. “I’m letting the dust settle a little bit on the event before I even think about next year, but that being said I think there’s a lot of people who want to give the WR another shot.” If you want to volunteer or just stay connected, use the PDX 100 × 1-mile Relay website’s contact form.

Dylan Hayes of Western Washington University

The results below are listed in order of completion. The first time for each runner is their mile split and the second is the cumulative time for the relay. Times were recorded to the hundredth of a second, but were rounded up for reporting.

1. Karim Shakalia 4:49, 4:49
2. Cody Barton 5:00, 9:49
3. Brian Manning 4:33, 14:22
4. Patrick Geoghegan 4:30, 18:52
5. Chris McIsaac 4:45, 23:37
6. Jeff Merill 4:43, 28:20
7. Brad Crowe 5:03,33:23
8. Gary Davis III 4:50, 38:13
9. Joseph Elsakr 4:43, 42:56
10. Ben Li 4:26, 47:22
11. Blake Medhaug 4:52, 52:14
12. Jordan Welling 4:19, 56:33
13. Nolan Hayes 5:10, 1:01:43
14. Ahrlin Bauman 4:45,1:06:28
15. Rory Jenkins 4:58, 1:11:26
16. Matt Tegenkamp 4:34, 1:16:00
17. Julian Heninger 4:19, 1:20:19
18. Phil Padilla 4:36,1:24:55
19. Ben Dejarnette 4:30, 1:29:25
20. Kieran Lee 4:42, 1:34:07
21. Matt Saunders 4:56, 1:39:03
22. Eddie Ortiz 4:57, 1:44:00
23. Andrew Heintz 5:45, 1:49:45
24. Johnathan Talik 4:41, 1:54:26
25. Benjamin Weingart 4:41, 1:59:07
26. Matt Crichlow 4:26, 2:03:33
27. Zac Garrard 4:29, 2:08:02
28. Nick Roche 4:27, 2:12:29
29. Andrew Lemoncello 4:26, 2:16:55
30. Scott Knackstedt 4:38, 2:21:33
31. Danny Martinez 4:22, 2:25:55
32. Alex Dillard 4:36, 2:30:31
33. Manny Guzman 5:29, 2:36:00
34. Nathan Fleck 4:44, 2:40:44
35. Chad Linnerooth 4:39, 2:45:23
36. Chris Derks 5:04, 2:50:27
37. Firaoll Abdella 5:02, 2:55:29
38. Kaleb Keyserling 4:44, 3:00:13
39. Derek Wehunt 4:41, 3:04:54
40. Dan Wehunt 4:27, 3:09:21
41. Alejandro Fallas 5:01, 3:14:22
42. Andrew Nelson 4:26, 3:18:48
43. Jake Campbell 4:33, 3:23:21
44. Jake Gardner 5:14, 3:28:35
45. Mike Blackmore 4:51, 3:33:26
46. Kevin Cave 4:38,3:38:04
47. Eric Barten 4:52, 3:42:56
48. Kit Kingstad 4:33, 3:47:29
49. Sean O’Hollearn 4:54, 3:52:23
50. Russell Drummond 4:55, 3:57:18
51. Matthew Palmer 4:17, 4:01:35
52. Billy Magnesen 4:26, 4:06:01
53. Rob Schlegel 4:49, 4:10:50
54. Erik Myers 4:39, 4:15:29
55. Carl Stones 4:26, 4:19:55
56. Will Nation 4:28, 4:24:23
57. JT Sullivan 4:17, 4:28:40
58. Miles Anderson 4:30, 4:33:10
59. Ben Iten 4:37, 4:37:47
60. Erik Stanley 4:25, 4:42:12
61. Alex Lohr 4:42, 4:46:54
62. Bennett Grimes 4:36, 4:51:30
63. Keegan McCormick 4:30, 4:56:00
64. James Jasperson 4:24, 5:00:24
65. Dylan Hayes 4:28, 5:04:52
66. Eric Hamel 4:33, 5:09:25
67. Edward Kiolbasa 4:38, 5:14:03
68. Chris Platano 4:26, 5:18:29
69. Gilbert Grundy 4:17, 5:22:46
70. Chris Reed 4:33, 5:27:19
71. Chris Yates 4:29, 5:31:48
72. Kyle Thompson 4:21, 5:36:09
73. Matt Piercy 4:34, 5:40:43
74. Daniel Thompson 4:33, 5:45:16
75. Evan Talan 4:31, 5:49:47
76. Mason Rouches 4:36, 5:54:23
77. Miles Rouches 4:33, 5:58:56
78. Ryan French 4:43, 6:03:39
79. Tyler Tenny 4:47, 6:08:26
80. Dyrrel Francisco 4:53, 6:13:19
81. Jesse Joseph 4:26, 6:17:45
82. Beau Armstrong 4:44, 6:22:29
83. Daniel Huling 4:40, 6:27:09
84. Jackson Baker 4:31, 6:31:40
85. Danny Robertson 4:42, 6:36:22
86. Christopher Roth 4:43, 6:41:05
87. Jeff Thies 4:20, 6:45:25
88. Taylor Overmiller 4:43, 6:50:08
89. Tyler Dudley 4:36, 6:54:44
90. Steven Short 4:48, 6:59:32
91. Ben Huszti 4:58, 7:04:30
92. Logan Orndorf 4:12, 7:08:42
93. Stuart McCullum 4:13, 7:12:55
94. Joe Horen 4:28, 7:17:23
95. Nick Hauger 4:16, 7:21:39
96. Tristan Peloquin 4:29, 7:26:08
97. Eric Laurel 4:45, 7:30:53
98. Kyle Medina 4:17, 7:35:10
99.Mathew Weissinger 4:58, 7:40:08
100. John Carley 4:36, 7:44:44

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About Kelly Barten (875 Articles)
I started the Run Oregon blog in February 2007, because I felt like running in Oregon and SW Washington deserved more positive coverage. I also wanted to level the playing field so that small, non-profit races could compete with big events; and to support LOCAL race organizers. I'm a Creighton Bluejay (undergrad) and an Oregon Duck (Sports Marketing MBA), and I live in Tigard with my husband and two kids. My "real job" is working for an incredibly awesome math textbook company doing marketing and production.

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