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Shoe Review: Brooks Ghost 12 (Women’s)

If you like running shoes that can last for miles without losing the cushion or spring, check out the Brooks Ghost 12. I’ve put about 100 miles on them in the past six weeks or so and they still feel like new when I put them on. Not gonna lie, I also wear these to work and to run errands, because I they’re so comfortable and I like the way they look.

This color of the Brooks Ghost 12 looks like an ice cream cone. Look at the laces!

These are a neutral shoe with a 12mm drop, with a cushion ride. They’ve got a really smooth upper with no seams to create hot spots and no pinching that I noticed. I wear a medium width shoe, but I lace my running shoes very loosely. The Brooks Ghost 12 was plenty wide for me without skipping any holes, so if you like a roomy toebox you should have luck with these.

Brooks has started using more an more proprietary technology in their shoes in the past few years. All these technologies have fancy names, but I’ll break down for you what they all mean. The Brooks Ghost uses:

3D Fit Print: This refers to the upper, which is all one piece. Rather than stitched-together pieces, the 3D Fit Print has varying stitch density and breathability to provide more support where needed and a nice, lightweight upper.

Segmented Crash Pad: Think of a snow leopard’s paws: they’re wide to distribute the animal’s weight evenly. The Segmented Crash Pad offers varying shock absorption along the sole to match a runner’s footstrike so you’ll have a smoother run.

DNA LOFT: Foam, air, and rubber calibrated to weigh less, last longer, and be more responsive (springier) when you run. Combined with BioMoGo DNA, these midsole components are what keep your feet from feeling fatigued 10 miles into your long run.

BioMoGo DNA: This is what keeps the midsole and the cushion from breaking down and keeps the shoe feeling new on after a month of daily runs.

Now, I’m fully aware that to judge a running shoe by anything other than it’s ability to fit well (thus preventing injury and making running more fun) is sort of silly. But I have to admit that I am so over the varying shades of blue and teal that have been so popular in women’s shoes for the past three years. Not that I could tell you what colors I do want, I just know that I want something different. This is where Brooks shoes have really impressed me. (I’m a consistent Brooks runner, but there have been times when I’ve been rotating between three pairs of blue Brooks.) The new designs are cool.

The NYC Ghost 12 is darn cool. Order by October 23 if you want it for marathon day.

The Ghost 12 currently comes in 14 designs, with the one pictured above being my absolute favorite. It’s for the NYC Marathon, and when you look at the design you’ll notice little details like the bike and the “NYC” on the heel that are just plain cool.Find the Brooks Ghost 12 for yourself at one of our local running stores – if you don’t see the color you want on their shelves, they can order it for you and often have it shipped directly to your home or work.

Note: I find that Brooks shoes run true to size. If you wear an 8 in dress shoes, I’d suggest you start by trying an 8 in Brooks. I personally get my running shoes a half-size larger because my feet tend to swell when running 6+ miles, but that’s a personal preference. Definitely go to a local running store to try these on; if there’s something slightly off about the fit, they can suggest alternate lacing methods to make them perfect. And we love supporting local businesses here at Run Oregon!

About Kelly Barten (1075 Articles)
I started the Run Oregon blog in February 2007, because I felt like running in Oregon and SW Washington deserved more positive coverage. I also wanted to level the playing field so that small, non-profit races could compete with big events; and to support LOCAL race organizers. I'm a Creighton Bluejay (undergrad) and an Oregon Duck (Sports Marketing MBA), and I live in Tigard with my husband and two kids. My "real job" is working for an incredibly awesome math textbook company doing marketing and production.

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