Checking out the new Spring 2021 collection from Tracksmith

Van Cortlandt Polo

There was a time when Tracksmith was a small, “boutique” running apparel company – with a small yet loyal following. They made New England-inspired items that seemed to bridge the gap between historical time periods of running with a modernized feel and performance-forward

In fact, their name itself even showcases this:

“TRACK” is a symbol of commitment to training and racing, while “SMITH” represents dedication to a specialized craft – an obsession with quality and function.

Over the years, Tracksmith remains committed to their unique style, but they aren’t so little anymore. Mary Cain and Nick Willis are now working with the brand and their gear is more sought after nationwide than it has been before. They have also started up an amateur support program which is aimed to take the runners of today and support them as they become the household names of tomorrow. Those Olympic Trials in Eugene 2021 should showcase some of these athletes. So, if you haven’t heard of Tracksmith, it’s time to get familiar.

They recently released their 2021 Spring Collection and we are, once again, in love.

First and foremost – just putting it out there – I LOVE the Van Cortlandt Polo. While new technology and designs are always being introduced into the marketplace, it isn’t often that a running shirt does something legitimately different. This top looks about as far away from your brain’s mental image of a running shirt, yet has all the functionality to go along with the style. On the surface, it’s a collared-shirt version of a running top (say what?), complete with buttons. To be fair, while this style isn’t generally seen on your local trails, it pays homage to the historical running style from about a century ago – with updated specs to be sure.

It is made from their 2:09 Mesh – a polyester / spandex mesh blend to keep it super lightweight and stylish. It’s beautiful to look at (and I have worn it in non-running settings more than once without anyone batting an eye), but really excels in its breathability and lightweight construction when working out. The collar does take a little getting used to, as will likely the number of people asking “what is that awesome shirt you are wearing?”!

The Twilight Shorts and Tee are a play on New England’s history with twilight track meets. There are no affiliations – it’s just about racing for the love of racing and putting yourself in the driver’s seat. Since there aren’t affiliations, runners can toe the line in understated gear and get after it. It’s just go and run under the radar. Thus, the tee is pretty basic in it’s appearance – but that’s by design. The qualities are not basic however – with the tee created from Italian Borgini fabric that is super light and super soft – as well having all the qualities in a quality running top – breathability and moisture-wicking. The shorts follow the same design experience, with the same outer construction as the tee, but I think they bring a little bit more flair to the table. The anti-odor, anti-microbial liner is key as well.

We hardly find bad things to say about Tracksmith most of the time. Their designs are always on point and we have found the craftmanship to be legit. The price tag is generally a little more than competitors, but we have found the premium to be worth it.

Company: Tracksmith (Facebook)
Products: 

  • Van Cortlandt Polo ($88)
    • 82% Polyester, 18% Spandex Tricot Mesh
  • Twilight Shorts ($58)
    • Bravio Blend: 85% Polyester 15% Elastane 115gsm
      Liner : Polygiene – 91% Polyester, 9% Spandex, 155gsm
  • Twilight Tee ($58)
    • Bravio Blend: 85% Polyester / 15% Elastane

 

Thank you to Tracksmith for providing us with samples. Please read our transparency page for info on how we do our reviews.

About Matt Rasmussen (1576 Articles)
Matt Rasmussen lives in Keizer, Ore. with his wife and three daughters. He enjoys watching the Olympics, sampling craft beers, and all things Canada (he was born there). Matt was raised as a baseball player and officially transitioned over to running in 2010.
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